Noticeable Changes In Copenhagen When Transportation Goes Green

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In a recent article from The New York Time's, Copenhagen hits the mark on going green when it comes to transportation. With a huge focus on recycling and cutting down on the amount of traffic, the impacts of going green are making quite an impact on air quality. One portion of the article explains:

Residents are being encouraged to opt for bicycles, and about two-thirds of the municipality’s own vehicles already run on electricity or hydrogen.

It is having an impact. Though Copenhagen’s population grew by 16 percent in the decade to 2015, its carbon dioxide emissions fell by 38 percent, the city estimates.

Copenhagen has certainly set a standard to follow. Here in the United States, several companies have recently won the Climate Leadership Award for their roles in reducing the carbon footprint. The Climate Leadership Conference that was held in Chicago is composed of 3 groups that come together annually to recognize the companies and individuals that go above and beyond in their efforts to save energy and reduce carbon emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Center For Climate And Energy Solutions, and The Climate Registryhave partnered together to determine who deserves recognition.

While all recipients take incredible strides toward improving efforts that affect climate, a few made excellent headway in the transportation department.

Proctor and Gamble, for example, have cut back 25 percent on truck transportation. Their overall goal is to reduce the amount of green house gases they emit by 30 percent come the year 2020.

Goldman Sachs was also recognized as achieving carbon neutrality in its business travel. Their goal is to maintain this standard while also investing billions in the clean energy sector.

The Director of Sustainability for JetBlue Airways, Ms. Sophia Mendelsohn, is also applauded for her efforts. She has brought to life what is considered "one of the largest biofuel purchase agreements in aviation history". This agreement aims to reduce emissions through the use of electric vehicles that perform ground support and to cut down on the amount of idling time for airplanes.

With so many people and companies working towards minimizing their output of green house gases, there is hope that their efforts will catch on and prompt others to go green as well. As seen in Copenhagen, the work that goes into making the changes that promote cleaner air do pay off.